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Design & culture

Polo Returns to China

March 2008, Prestige Magazine, Hong Kong Jo Baker delves into the Middle Kingdom’s new highlife on horseback Download original: Prestige Polo A line of Australia’s finest polo ponies fidget unhappily in their stalls, one picking moodily at the stable planks with his well-bred teeth. China is in the throes of its worst winter in fifty years, and it’s not only the people here that are suffering. “They don’t really like being inside,” says Romiro Pellegrini, a young vet and skillful Polo player from Argentina. “They’re athletes. They want to be out playing, and this snow just gets them down.” The ponies of China’s new Nine Dragons Hill Polo Club may well be dreaming of last October; three days in which man and horse tussled on a field of verdant grass to a backdrop of fizzing champagne, hats of architectural daring ... Read the full article

Love is in the wear

  South China Morning Post, Hong Kong, April 24, 2009 Architecture with a lived-in touch is winning hearts When architect Bill Bensley was asked to design a hotel in Phuket not long after the tsunami, he found himself wanting to give it a deeper layer of meaning. That layer was found by his team of Thai and Indonesian designers at salvage auctions in the area, where they bought driftwood and other bits of wreckage wrought by the giant wave, and incorporated them into the hotel, Indigo Pearl. “We picked up a whole lot of materials and in various innovative ways reused them, in the structure, in sculptures,” he recalls. The hotel, which also uses a lot of old tin in tribute to the area’s tin mining history, has received rave reviews for its vision and its sensitivity. Using architectural salvage like this is ... Read the full article

Stay Overnight in a Turkish Mansion

May 14, 2009, Time Magazine "Make yourself at home" may be a refrain heard in guesthouses the world over, but it takes on new meaning when it comes from one of your host country's wealthiest families — and when your temporary "home" is their mansion. The Buyukkusoglu family, who made their fortune in the automotive industry, converted their 48,400-sq-ft (4,500 sq m) modern manor house in Bodrum, Turkey, on the edge of the Aegean Sea into a 12-suite hotel, and in 2007 opened it to paying guests as the Casa Dell'Arte. "We wanted the hotel to still feel like a house, and to be very social," says owner Fatos Buyukkusoglu, who led the hotel's design team and lives in a ... Read the full article

Basic Instincts

South China Morning Post, Hong Kong, March 27, 2009 Keeping it simple is the order of the day as people seek comfort in uncertain times The opening of high-end serviced apartments in Sheung Wan last month saw a rare aesthetic for Hong Kong: the Yin’s 42 studios offer glimpses of brickwork, flashes of exposed piping, and baths carved out of stone blocks. This kind of warehouse-hip has been run-of-the-mill in other cities for years, yet in Hong Kong it has always struggled, and usually drowned, under heaps of suede, crystal and polished wood. Still, Philip Liao of design firm Liao and Partners thought that now might be the time to give it a go – albeit with a sanitized and slightly Zen-like twist. “I ... Read the full article

Dalian Wonder

March 2009, Silkroad Magazine, China A colourful past has created a bright future for this cosmopolitan city “You won’t find much of China in Dalian,” one foreign resident recently observed over coffee, and he has a point. At one time Russian, another Japanese and with a host of names and identities in its recent past, Dalian is as famous today for its female ‘mounties’ on horseback and its links with Canon and Mitsubishi, as it is its excellent sea food.  But on one of its famously clear days in one of the many squares, watching couples parade and old men practice water calligraphy, Dalian can also be the best of China. Many agree, and it has been voted one of the most ... Read the full article

To the Manor Born

Perspective Magazine, Hong Kong, December 2008 Along the Aegean coast an intriguing new boutique hotel seeks to celebrate and reinvigorate traditional Anatolian-style architecture with a contemporary twist and a healthy injection of Turkish art When the world "homey" is used to describe a hotel it rarely applies to anything bigger than a few thousand square metres; very few people, after all, can call a manor house home. But for the non-mansion dwellers among us there are hotels like Casa Dell'Arte on the Aegean coast. When the world ‘homey’ is used to describe a hotel it rarely applies to anything bigger than a few thousand square metres; very few people, after all, can call a manor house home. But for the non-mansion dwellers among us there are hotels ... Read the full article

Playground Attraction

July 2008, Gafencu Men Magazine, China Dubai is the fastest growing city on earth, and as the strategic financial centre the Middle East it is becoming a playground for the very, very rich There is a frission of guilty pleasure to be had from heading to one of the earth’s hottest, driest places to ski, swim and indulge in climate-controlled shopping sprees, and it is one that this year prompted around seven million to pack light and head to Dubai. This small nation of 1.3 million people will soon have forty mega-malls, 7 new theme parks and over 530 hotels to its name, not to mention a pulsating new club scene and a penchant for luxury sporting events. And with that kind of party laid on – well, it would be downright rude not to show up. Back in the early sixties, ... Read the full article

Bay City Rollin’

April 2008, Gafencu Men Magazine, China Times may be tighter, but the Bay City is still rolling in it Of all San Francisco’s incarnations, the one most loved in Asia is its face from the 1990s – a thrilling time when the dot-com boom made a millionaire a minute and the city’s more bohemian, beatnik impulses were buried deep.  “There were parties every single night and they were always totally over the top” remembers Charlotte Milan, who runs a luxury travel and wine public relations firm there, C.Milan Communications.  “People were bringing in dance troupes from Israel, doing shot after shot of caviar and it was like: how much can we have? How much, how much?” Ten years later and the brashness has gone. The Bay ... Read the full article

One Night in Hong Kong

December 13, 2007, Time Magazine Frank Sun, restaurateur and architect Have a drink at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel's Captain's Bar, tel: (852) 2825 4006. It has a lot of history. Then take a walk from there to Sheung Wan — a very different side of old Hong Kong and one that is rapidly disappearing. You can visit shops that still make traditional sausages and sell dried seafood. After that, take the tram all the way to North Point. On the third floor of the market at 99 Java Road you'll find the Tung Po seafood restaurant, tel: (852) 2880 9399. Ask for the owner Robby, or his partner Larry. Tell him you would like to order dishes Frank likes to eat. When you've finished dinner, take a cab back to the SoHo ("South of ... Read the full article

Happy Families

October 4, 2007, Time Magazine Sequestered on a hill about a 40-minute drive from Chiang Mai, Proud Phu Fah doesn't attract young urbanites so much as families and others looking for a quiet puff of Thai mountain air. Yet that's not to say that the hotel lacks contemporary style. The first clue to its existence comes on a bare, green stretch of road in the Mae Rim Valley, where a small sign beckons: HIP HOTEL AND RESTAURANT. The next is a gate in an isolated grassy lay-by, where soft jazz pipes from the trees. "We wanted to try a new concept," says co-owner Siriphen Siwanarak, who left a design job in Bangkok to build the place with her husband. "When guests arrive they see this gate first, then follow the stream, ... Read the full article

New Architects of China

Architecture Week, USA, September 19, 2007, But while firms from around the world are delightedly helping China push its design boundaries, the country's own young architects may be the most interesting to watch. On the Edge: Ten Architects from China, edited by Ian Luna with Thomas Tsang, is the first English-language anthology to place them firmly in the spotlight. The learning curve for these young, hip studios has been a steep one. Though the nation can boast a rich aesthetic heritage, Mao's Cultural Revolution put pay to any form of modern exploration in the field. It also left most of the older architectural masterpieces in tatters. Design students in the 1980s and '90s had no creative role models and little contemporary Chinese design to draw from, leaving them with ... Read the full article

Higher Education

July 16, 2007, Time Magazine It's a common problem. You book a trip, fail to pick up a phrase book and before you know it you're shaking hands, toasting — or wildly gesticulating — in your destination, wishing you had mastered just a couple of phrases of the local language. Since 2005, travelers on selected flights of Singapore Airlines, Lufthansa and half a dozen other carriers have been avoiding this problem with Berlitz World Traveler courses, available on personal video screens. Now other airlines are following suit — this year, Continental, KLM and Air France began offering the onboard language-tuition program, which teaches the basics of up to 23 languages in 21 languages. So should you be from Brazil and need to brush up on your Tamil, or from Vietnam and ... Read the full article

A Time to Reap

South China Morning Post, August 2006 For a long time Siem Reap has been little more than a launching pad into Angkor, a dusty frontier town of fumes and lurking potholes, of children with large eyes and speedy fingers. Very few tourists tend to leave with tales of overwhelming warmth, applauding the local hospitality. This may have something to do with its messy economics. As part of the country’s second poorest province the town offers a great escape for farmers tired of battling with the local scrub land. But the faster they flood in, the faster chain hotels and tour operators tend to funnel tourist dollars out, leaving what amounts to a money vacuum. In it, Siem Reap has become defined by its most successful bread winners – kids - those big eyes and speedy fingers commanding a notorious (and ... Read the full article